All posts in: 3d Renderings
audi R8 3d model maya
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Remember that 3d model of an Audi R8 that I started building in Maya two years ago? Don’t worry, I hardly remember many of the details myself (lol) but I’m happy to report that I’ve revived it from the dead and managed to get it wrapped up. The entire project started as a way for me to dive head first into the world of 3d modeling in Maya, and it even though I bailed on it early on I’ve still considered it a successful exercise. First of all, the work that I put into it way back then was the perfect introduction polygonal modeling and I was able to put the project aside feeling like I had a gained a very solid understanding of what it takes to build complex surfaces in Maya. I wasn’t an expert at that point (heck, I don’t even consider myself an expert now) but the knowledge I gained from that short stint of automotive modeling allowed me to jump into other Maya projects with ease.

But you know me – I feel uneasy when my pile of unfinished projects start backing up and I couldn’t resist the urge to pull this R8 out of my archives and finish what I started two years ago. The biggest reason for wanting to finish, I think, was the fact that cars are my biggest passion in life and I’ve always wanted to get into automotive design and modeling. And I’ve never built a complete 3d model of a car. So yeah – I just had to finish this, if only to say that I’ve built a car in 3d.

So, if you recall, here is where I left off in August of 2014:

Audi R8 3d wireframe

Audi R8 3d wireframe in progress

Audi R8 3d wireframe

Front 3/4 view

And here is the completed 3d model:

audi R8 3d model maya

Completed Audi R8 3d model in all white. Don’t look at it too closely…there are a ton of embarrassing panel gaps that would make a 1975 Lincoln look good in comparison!

Wireframe over the 3d model

Wireframe over the 3d model

audi r8 3d model wireframe

This is definitely not low-poly. I chose to model the tires instead of using texture maps, so that added a lot of complexity to this project.

audi R8 wireframe 3d model

One of my biggest mistakes was not taking the time to be sure that the polygon flow matched from panel to panel (compare the doors to the front and rear quarter panels). This resulted in a lot of messy transitions and weird panel gaps.

audi R8 wireframe 3d model

It may look decent at first glance, but there a ton of newbie mistakes here. Oh well – all I can do is to apply what I’ve learned to my next automotive 3d model!

Is it perfect? Absolutely not! The surfaces of the Audi R8 are generally simple and not overly complex, but there were a few sections that I really struggled with. The taillight area is a total disaster and not anywhere near accurate. Same goes for the headlights – no matter how many vertices I pushed and pulled, I just couldn’t get it to look smooth and accurate. This entire model is what I consider to be a “10-footer”, meaning that it looks okay from a distance of 10 feet or so, but things get gnarly when viewed up close.

Even though it’s quite rough around the edges and very amateurish in spots, it’s a relief to have it wrapped up and close enough to call “done”. Many of the flaws were from errors I made very early on in the modeling process that wouldn’t be able to be rectified without starting over from scratch. Could I have fixed many of the problem areas? You bet. But it would have taken a lot of time to do – time which I would rather spend working on my next automotive model instead of trying to polish this turd.

free parts
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I haven’t had much time to work on 3d renderings lately, but I’m trying to tinker as much as I can so I don’t forget how to do this stuff. I’m not kidding – the intricacies of FormZ and Maya are so complex that I start forgetting things after only a few weeks of non-use. That need to keep tinkering is how this set of 3d renderings came to be. I wasn’t even trying to create a full set of images here…I just needed to do something to keep my 3d knowledge fresh.

Luckily I’ve got a pretty good system of pre-lit environments set up in FormZ that I can just dump objects into and render. Not having to set up environments from scratch saves a ton of time, which is really important to me these days. Time is something I don’t have much of anymore, so I’m taking advantage of anything that I can get! The downside to that is many of my renderings tend to look the same, so the balance of time and creativity (learning new things) is something I think about a lot. What’s more important? Spending 4 hours on one amazing illustration, or creating 10 in that same time period that are similar to what I’ve already been doing for years? I know that I’d learn a lot more by slowing my output and focusing on fewer (and better) images instead of trying to crank out as many as I can. But letting go of the feeling of needing to produce as much as humanly possible is hard to let go of, especially since that’s what the Norebbo brand was built on (in the beginning). But I’m getting off track here…

Free Time

Free Time

Free Help

Free Help

Anyway, these three renderings consist of various objects posing with bright red FREE tags. The one with the lifesaver is the one I like the most. It represents the concept of “free help”, which I think could be a useful image for anyone offering that kind of service. Please feel free to use the image to promote your own brand or product – and I’d love it if you send me a link showing how you used it!

movie delivery stock photo
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I recently upgraded to the latest version of FormZ (v8), and finishing this set of stock illustrations featuring movie clap boards was the first time that I really got the chance to dive in deep and try out all the new features. These aren’t the first renderings I’ve created in the new version though – that honor goes to my Google+ mini-set, which I am still thinking about finishing (someday). I’ve got a lot of fun ideas for that one which should work pretty good when modeled in 3d.

I actually started this multimedia-themed clap board collection in FormZ 7 last summer. I never did get around to finishing all the renderings that were on my list, but I wanted to get it wrapped up, so I imported what I had created so far into the latest version and got to work. Importing old project files into the latest software always makes me nervous (will it even work??), and I did run into a couple issues here. The first (and most annoying) was that the parameters of my saved views were all messed up. The cameras were intact, but the viewing angles were not. I basically had to rebuild all my views, which is something I usually spend a lot of time on to get looking just right. The second issue I had was that all my texture maps were lost – so I had to manually re-map everything.

Other than that, I’m starting to like version 8 a lot. Of course it’s nowhere near as powerful as Maya is, but this is good 3d modeling software for creating simple (but great looking) renderings.

Anyway, this is an eclectic collection of images. Any one of them could be used in association with movie-production topics, but there are a handful that are more generic and would work well for anything related to multimedia in general.

movie addiction stock illustration

Movie Addiction

movie research stock illustration

Movie Research

movies on sale stock photo

Movies on Sale

car movie stock photo

Car Movie

movie database stock photo

Movie Database

making movies stock photo

Movie Making

movie premier stock photo

Movie Premier

award winning movie stock photo

Award Winning Movie

clap board on a soap box stock photo

Film With a Message

So there you have it. And now that I have a decent 3d model of this clap board built, don’t be surprised to see it make random appearances in other renderings going forward!

Smartphone Sale
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The trouble with creating conceptual stock illustrations of anything related to the world of tech is that those images don’t have much of a useful lifespan. My 3d rendering collection consists largely of tech-related concepts, so it’s a major bummer that much of my early work (starting in 2006) has become horribly outdated and darn near useless for anything but laughs.

Because of that, I spend a lot of time recreating and modernizing some of my oldest and most outdated images. A perfect example of that is this series of smart phone illustrations, created to directly replace my old collection of conceptual flip-phone renderings. That flip-phone collection had a good run, but they are understandably not so relevant today and there is nothing more I can do with that set. They are gone for good, forever regulated to my personal archives never to be seen again. Maybe someday I can create a “Norebbo Classics” section of the blog where I can post old images and we can all sit around and laugh at technology long forgotten. 🙂

Anyway this collection of smart phone illustrations marks the beginning of what I hope will become a much larger set. There are a variety of concepts here featuring the same basic device, some with a blank display, and some with a generic home screen that I created. I realize that most people would want to map their own custom screens onto these illustrations, but I just wanted to include a few “complete” images just in case anyone needed them.

Free Smartphone

Free Smartphone

Smartphone Security

Smartphone Security

Smartphone Data

Smartphone Data

Smart Phone Audio

Smart Phone Audio

Smartphone Batteries

Smartphone Batteries

Chained to Your Smart phone

Chained to Your Smart Phone

Black Smartphone with Blank Screen

Black Smartphone with Blank Screen

Black Smartphone with Home Screen

Black Smartphone with Home Screen

White Smartphone with Blank Screen

White Smartphone with Blank Screen

White Smartphone with Home Screen

White Smartphone with Home Screen

Smartphone Help

Smartphone Help

Smart Phone Chips

Smart Phone Chips

UX Design for Mobile Devices

UX Design for Mobile Devices

Smartphone Tools

Smartphone Tools

Smart Phone Research

Smart Phone Research

Smart Phone with Connected Cord

Smart Phone with Connected Cord

Smart Phone Sale

Smart Phone Sale

Locked Smart Phone

Locked Smart Phone

Smart Phone and Checkmark

Smart Phone and Checkmark

Global Smart Phone

Global Smart Phone

Broken Smart Phone

Broken Smart Phone

Hopefully you’ll find some of these smart phone renderings useful. You can always leave a comment if there’s something in particular you’d like to see, and I’ll do my best to try and get it into my rendering schedule. I also want to create some different devices (tablets, for example) just for the sake of variety. But I’m probably going to be forced into doing it anyway once the next big thing is on the market and I’m forced to retire this set…

cloud space for rent
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With all the talk about cloud technology these days, it seemed like a no-brainer to create a set of stock illustrations featuring clouds with a variety of different objects. The trouble is that I’m not much of an organic 3d modeler – my style is a bit more on the chunky side of things, and I found it to be quite a challenge to recreate a useful cloud-looking object that could work in a variety of different poses and perspectives. As you can see here, I settled on a simple icon-style design complete with an ultra-blingy chrome finish. And I’ll let you in on a little secret: that simplicity is what allows me to create so many illustrations from a single object. There’s no way I could be able to generate so many images if I only built objects that looked good from one angle!

You’ve seen this cloud from me before here and there (if you’ve been paying attention), and I even used a variation of it with Facebook logos a little over two years ago. But I thought it would be good to finally post the entire collection here on the blog for those who might have a use for them.

So here’s the full set:

No Access to the Cloud

No Access to the Cloud

Space in the Cloud for Sale

Space in the Cloud for Sale

Keep Out of the Cloud

Keep Out of the Cloud

Data in the Cloud

Data Activity in the Cloud

Search the Cloud

Search the Cloud

Cloud Strategy

Cloud Strategy

Financial Data in the Cloud

Financial Data in the Cloud

I’ve also got a series of these metallic clouds over white backgrounds (and with different objects) that I’ll post soon. IMHO, the versions with the white backgrounds look better!

red smart watch
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Wearable technology is all the rage these days, but I’ll admit that I haven’t been tempted by any of it. Head mounted displays (HMDs) and smart watches aren’t fully matured yet, and most of the products currently on the market just seem so…compromised. But I know all too well how fast technology moves, and I’m sure it won’t be long until you see me sporting the latest tech/fashion gadgets – heck, I laughed the first iPad off as a “worthless piece of crap” the day it was announced, but I’m not going to lie when I say that I can’t live without my Apple tablet today. Yeah, I can be stubborn and short-sighted sometimes…

Anyway, last year I created a series of generic smart watch designs for stock illustration purposes. The images you see here are the best examples from two different sets. The first batch I created (at the bottom of this post) was based around a very simple and blocky design, which I never really liked all that much. That lack of satisfaction kept eating at me for several months, so I decided to give it another go with a slightly more detailed and curved design. The illustration of the red smart watch at the top of this post is from that second set, along with this chrome one:

chrome smart watches

3d rendering of two polished metal smart watches with a glowing pulse graphic on the screen over a dark reflective surface

And yeah – I created these in Maya just as I was still learning my way around, so they took far too long to stage and render (which is the same problem I had with my forklift illustrations). For comparisons sake, the illustrations of the more angular smart watches (below) were created in FormZ within a matter of hours – fully rendered and all.

silver smart watch

3d illustration of a generic smart watch over a white background

upright smart watch illustration

3d illustration of the front three quarter view of a glass and metal smart watch over a white background

If you need to map your own custom design onto the face of the display, these blocky watches will probably serve you better. That’s precisely why they look the way they do – I knew that most people who use these images will need to customize them somehow, and a curved screen would give even the best Photoshop professionals serious heartburn.

I may do more of these in the future, so stay on the lookout.

yellow forklift illustration
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As a recent convert to Maya, one of my first stock illustration projects I did in that software package was a simple forklift. I’ve always wanted to build one so that I could use it in a variety of my other stock illustrations, but it was hard to get it right in FormZ. It was certainly possible – but I kept putting it off and, well…you know how that goes. But I’m happy to report that building something like this is much easier in Maya, so I now I didn’t have an excuse anymore.

Forklifts are nice as conceptual objects for stock illustration. They represent things like “storage”, “organizing”, “movement”, “warehousing” and so on – all of which are topics that aren’t represented well in my existing portfolio of images.

Unfortunately, being that I’m a Maya newbie and all, these four renderings took far too long to complete. The biggest problem was rendering times. Holy crap! The image below with the globe took 24 hours to render, which is something I’m not used to at all. Even my most complicated FormZ renderings never took more than a couple hours. I’m pretty sure it’s because I’ve got the quality settings higher than they should be, so I’ll definitely have to look into that. My short attention span demands it!

Anyway, here are the final illustrations from this first batch, all measuring 1024x728px. Feel free to use them however you wish, and look for more illustrations with forklift-based themes in the future!

forklift and globe

3d rendering of a bright yellow forklift carrying a glowing transparent globe over a dark reflective surface

forklift tires

3d rendering of a bright yellow forklift carrying a large wheel and tire over a dark gray reflective surface

all white forklift 3d model

3d rendering of an all white forklift over a white surface