All posts tagged: 737-700
AeroMexico 787-8 side view rendering
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There hasn’t been much time for aircraft illustrations in my busy life over the past 6 weeks or so, but I have been tinkering here and there with some AeroMexico renderings for my travel blog whenever I could find spare time. I’m also trying to get Airbus A340 templates created, but those kind of technical drawings take a lot longer to do compared to these livery illustrations. And I fully admit that the livery illustrations are a million times more fun than the templates are – playing with graphics and color will always be much more interesting than drawing part lines on fuselages!

AeroMexico used to have a pretty cool livery. It was polished aluminum (just like the old American Airlines livery), and it looked downright awesome in bright sunlight. It probably pissed off other pilots every now and then due to how reflective that color scheme was, but it was a real looker for sure. But then the aircraft manufactures started building airplanes with non-metallic composite skin materials, which meant that all those beautiful polished-aluminum liveries of old had do go. You can’t polish carbon fiber, so the best the airlines could do was to start painting airplanes white. American Airlines is using silver paint instead of white at the moment, but to be honest, it looks like dull gray unless you see it in bright sunlight.

aeromexico 787 side view white background

Side profile illustration of an AeroMexico Boeing 787-8 over a blank white background with and without the landing gear deployed

The new livery that AeroMexico came up with is represented here on both the 787-8 and 737-700. I will give them credit for being creative with the curved two-tone blue tail section that blends into the white fuselage, but it seems as if they ran out of ideas (or budget) with that random red “stripe” on the forward section of the aircraft. That splash of color is nice – I think the red goes very nicely with the white and blue, but it simply doesn’t integrate with any other design element in a meaningful way. My experience as a designer tells me that it was likely added at the last minute by a non-designer executive who thought that “a little splash of red would be nice” even though there wasn’t enough money in the budget to add more paint to the airplanes. I can’t imagine that any designer, who after designing such a good looking tail section, thought that slapping that random swoopy red stripe to the forward section was a good idea.

AeroMexico 737-700 side view white background

Side profile illustration of an AeroMexico Boeing 737-752 over a blank background with and without the landing gear deployed

On a final note, I didn’t realize it until I made these illustrations that the engine covers are not painted blue on the 787. I assumed the liveries were the same across all AeroMexico aircraft, but I actually think I like the white engines better since it puts more emphasis on the tail section (and that ever important logo).

Southwest 737-700 side view
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Love ‘em or hate ‘em, Southwest Airlines have always had bold liveries that have drawn attention. The original “mustard rocket” colors were unlike anything else in the air at that time, and the current blue, yellow, and orange get-up is in a league of it’s own as well. So yeah – the designer in me naturally gives them a lot of credit for bucking the trend and doing something different than most of the other airlines (who prefer stark-white fuselages with small splashes of color here and there).

I’ve been putting off illustrating a Southwest 737 for a long time and wouldn’t you know it, soon after I finished it,  Southwest threw everyone a curve ball with the announcement of a brand new livery which placed more emphasis on the “Southwest” titles. That means I’ve got to play catch-up now and illustrate a version of that one. That’s the trouble with doing airliner art – the industry moves fast and it will never be possible for one person to draw them all. At least I have something to keep me busy until I die…

Really though, I’m not bugged by it. I actually like documenting the old airliner liveries the most, and since I eventually plan on creating renderings of every single Southwest color scheme, this means one less I’ll have to do later on. The mustard rocket colors are most interesting to me though, so you’ll likely see that one first.

boeing 737-700 side view illustration
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I’m on a roll now. It wasn’t very long ago that I finished my Boeing 787-9 illustrations, and I had enough enthusiasm left over in me to go ahead and tackle yet another much-needed variant: the Boeing 737-700. I’ll tell you what, I like doing these variants a whole heck of a lot better than creating templates of an aircraft from scratch – it takes hardly any time at all (comparatively) and there’s no need to mentally psych myself up for a huge project. So I took my existing template of a 737-800 of and started chopping…

Compared to it’s bigger brothers (the 737-800 and -900), I like the look of the -700 series the most. It has a perfect wing to fuselage ratio (IMHO) that makes it look well balanced from all angles. And a bit stout and muscular too, which can’t be said for larger versions of this same airplane.

outline line drawing boeing 737-700

Boeing 737-700 technical line drawing

Because I like the looks of it so much, I drew this template at a slightly wider angle than most of my other ones. Doing this puts a bit more emphasis on the winglets, which I like, and I don’t think it’s extreme enough that it makes these drawings too artistic to be used for technical reference. Whereas all of my other templates are drawn as you’d see them through a 55mm camera lens (roughly), this -700 is drawn at more like 45mm. So, not so much of a difference but I think it creates a nice look.

So now that I have the -700 and -800 variants of the 737 complete, I’m probably going to do the -900 before I go back and do some of the classics such as the -100 through -500 series. Those older versions will take longer to do because of differences in engines and wing structure, and I’m in no mood to psych myself up to tackle that kind of thing right now!